Y el león, por fin, en niño

Mario Opazo’s work, which is known for his philosophical references and for his display of a wide variety of mediums that extend from complex artifacts to overflowing audiovisual installations, this time proposes a much simpler lecture, like a fable told to children before bed. The artist is inspired by one of Nietzche’s central ideas: Zaratustra has spoken: “Three transformations of the spirit I have mentioned: how the spirit has turned into a camel, and the camel into a lion, and the lion, at last, into a child.” In an introspective look at his work, Opazo reflects upon his journey through these three phases in over thirty years of artistic production: after persevering obediently as the camel (as an emerging artist), later, determined and ambitious like the lion (as a distinguished and consecrated artist), and today, self defining in the spiritual state of the child.

From:
February 24, 2022
To:
April 8, 2022

Mario Opazo’s work, which is known for his philosophical references and for his display of a wide variety of mediums that extend from complex artifacts to overflowing audiovisual installations, this time proposes a much simpler lecture, like a fable told to children before bed. The artist is inspired by one of Nietzche’s central ideas: Zaratustra has spoken: “Three transformations of the spirit I have mentioned: how the spirit has turned into a camel, and the camel into a lion, and the lion, at last, into a child.” In an introspective look at his work, Opazo reflects upon his journey through these three phases in over thirty years of artistic production: after persevering obediently as the camel (as an emerging artist), later, determined and ambitious like the lion (as a distinguished and consecrated artist), and today, self defining in the spiritual state of the child.

With the beginning, the awe, and the curiosity characteristic of this new stage, Opazo recurs to expressive mediums such as drawing, collage, painting, and sculpture, which, in his hands, cannot be referred to as traditional mediums but, curiously, as “new mediums,” in which the manual craft results in objects whose apparent innocence refers to the traditional and ancestral cosmogonies of the South. It is because of this, that the political DNA of this work remains reflecting upon the latinamerican identity, its cultural issues and affinities. As remnants of experiences, all these poetic images of fauna, mysticism, and American landscape that come from his trips to the Patagonia, the Andes or the Amazon, are proposed as hints so that even children may be involved and decipher the critical questions that this exhibition proposes: What identities are we made up of? What makes us American? What fable are we?